WHO issues new guidance for treating children with severe acute malnutrition

NOV , 27 2013

GENEVA – WHO today released new treatment guidelines for the almost 20 million children under-five worldwide who have severe acute malnutrition.

Severe acute malnutrition is when children suffer severe wasting that may or may not be accompanied by swelling of the body from fluid retention. It occurs when infants and children do not have adequate energy, protein and micronutrients in their diet, combined with other health problems such as recurrent infections. It is diagnosed when the circumference of the upper arm is less than 115 mm or when the weight for height of a child is severely reduced.

Children with severe acute malnutrition are among the most vulnerable people in the world. They are very thin: most of their fat and muscle has been used by their bodies to stay alive.

Main recommendations

The updated WHO guidelines recommend that children with severe acute malnutrition who do not have health complications that require hospitalization, receive special, high-energy food and antibiotics to treat infection. This allows them to recover at home with their families. They also give guidance on how to treat them for HIV and, if necessary make recommendations on how to treat severely malnourished infants under six months.

“The guidelines are critical because many national health plans currently overlook children with severe acute malnutrition… If these children don’t get the right medical and nutritional care, very often they die,”

Dr Francesco Branca, Director, WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development

“The guidelines are critical because many national health plans currently overlook children with severe acute malnutrition. This can be fatal. If these children don’t get the right medical and nutritional care, very often they die,” says Dr Francesco Branca, Director of WHO’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development.

New guidelines reflect new opportunities and technologies

The new guidelines supersede those issued by WHO in 1999 which recommended that all severely malnourished children be hospitalized, given fortified formula milk and appropriate treatment including antibiotics. The guidelines have been updated to reflect new opportunities and technologies that allow severely malnourished children who have an appetite and no evident medical complications to be effectively treated at home with specially-formulated foods that provide energy and nutrients and antibiotic medicines.

“It’s generally better for children and better for their families if they’re treated as outpatients,” says Dr Elizabeth Mason, Director of WHO’s Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health. “It can be easier for families who need to continue providing and caring for other children, and it allows vulnerable, malnourished children to stay home and avoid the risk of getting hospital infections.”

The proactive use of antibiotics is important because the immune system of a child who is severely malnourished can virtually shut down. This lack of immune response means both that the body cannot fight off infection and that tests may not detect infection, even when one is present. Evidence shows that giving a broad spectrum antibiotic such as amoxicillin enables the child’s body to fight off common infections like pneumonia and urinary tract infections which can be fatal to this group of children.

However, the new recommendation is specifically for children with severe acute malnutrition—not those who are simply undernourished. Widespread use of antibiotics among children who do not need them would increase the risk of infections becoming resistant to lifesaving antibiotics—a situation that would harm the health and survival of all children.

Severely malnourished children with HIV

Another new aspect of the guidelines relates to the treatment of severely malnourished children with HIV. The 1999 guidelines did not recommend HIV testing of children with severe acute malnutrition. At that time, there was poor availability and little experience of treating children with antiretroviral drugs. Circumstances today are very different. We now know that antiretrovirals significantly increase survival of children with HIV, and access to these drugs is improving. The new guidelines recommend that children with severe acute malnutrition in countries where HIV is common be routinely tested for the virus, and those who are positive should start on antiretroviral drugs as well as special foods and antibiotics to treat their severe malnutrition.

Infants under 6 months with severe acute malnutrition

The other group whose needs are addressed for the first time in these guidelines are infants under 6 months with severe acute malnutrition. WHO recommends that all babies under 6 months are exclusively breastfed for optimal nutrition and protection against infections. This is particularly important for babies who are severely malnourished. Health services should give special support to mothers of these infants to breastfeed as well as treating the child with antibiotics. If there is no realistic prospect of a severely malnourished baby being breastfed, the family may need breast milk from another woman, e.g. a family member, a neighbour, a wet nurse or a milk bank. If this is not possible, they will need infant formula and support to prepare and use it safely.


Adolescents falling through gaps in HIV services

NOV ,25  2013

Reference : 

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/releases/2013/hiv-adolescents-20131125/en/index.html

 GENEVA – More than 2 million adolescents between the ages of 10 and 19 years are living with HIV, and many do not receive the care and support that they need to stay in good health and prevent transmission. In addition, millions more adolescents are at risk of infection.

The failure to support effective and acceptable HIV services for adolescents has resulted in a 50% increase in reported AIDS-related deaths in this group compared with the 30% decline seen in the general population from 2005 to 2012.

Addressing the specific needs of adolescents

The WHO recommendations “HIV and adolescents: Guidance for HIV testing and counselling and care for adolescents living with HIV” are the first to address the specific needs of adolescents both for those living with HIV as well as those who are at risk of infection. They are being released in advance of World AIDS Day 2013 (1 December).

“Adolescents face difficult and often confusing emotional and social pressures as they grow from children into adults,” says Dr Gottfried Hirnschall, Director of WHO HIV/AIDS Department. “Adolescents need health services and support, tailored to their needs. They are less likely than adults to be tested for HIV and often need more support than adults to help them maintain care and to stick to treatment.”

“Adolescents need health services and support, tailored to their needs. They are less likely than adults to be tested for HIV and often need more support than adults to help them maintain care and to stick to treatment.”

Dr Gottfried Hirnschall, Director of WHO HIV/AIDS Department

Across sub-Saharan Africa, many who were infected at birth are becoming adolescents. In addition to the many changes associated with adolescence, they also face the challenges of living with a chronic infection: disclosing the news to friends and family and preventing transmission to sexual partners.

“Adolescent girls, young men who have sex with men, those who inject drugs or are subject to sexual coercion and abuse are at highest risk. They face many barriers, including harsh laws, inequalities, stigma and discrimination which prevent them from accessing services that could test, prevent, and treat HIV,” says Craig McClure, Chief of HIV programmes for UNICEF. “About one-seventh of all new HIV infections occur during adolescence. Unless the barriers are removed, the dream of an AIDS-free generation will never be realized.”

Making it easier to know HIV status

Furthermore, many young people do not know their HIV status. For example, in sub-Saharan Africa, it is estimated that only 10% of young men and 15% of young women (15-24 years) know their HIV status and, in other regions, although data is scarce, access to HIV testing and counseling by vulnerable adolescents is consistently reported as being very low.

WHO recommends governments review their laws to make it easier for adolescents to obtain HIV testing without needing consent from their parents. The guidelines also suggest ways that health services can improve the quality of care and social support for adolescents. And they highlight the value of involving this age group to create an adolescent-centered approach to the services that work for people of their age.

Better equipping adolescents

“Young people need to be better equipped to manage their HIV infection and take ownership of their health care,” says Dr Elizabeth Mason, Director of WHO Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health Department. “We have seen for example in Zimbabwe that, by developing adolescent friendly services, it is possible to achieve good treatment outcomes among adolescents. We urge others to be inspired by these examples.”

To help health workers put these recommendations into practice WHO has developed a new online tool which will be launched in January 2014. It uses practical examples from country programmes that are working closely with adolescents on HIV issues.

Note to editors

The guidelines provide recommendations and expert suggestions – mainly for policy-makers and national programme managers – on prioritizing, planning and providing HIV testing, counselling and care services for adolescents. Designed to be used with the recent WHO consolidated Antiretroviral guidelines, these new guidelines provide complimentary recommendations and guidance to support better provision of services to help adolescents remain in care and adhere to treatment.

The guidelines were developed based on scientific evidence, community consultations with adolescents and health workers, field experience of health workers and expert opinion. WHO led the development of these guidelines in collaboration with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the Global Network of People Living with HIV (GNP+), the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).


Philippines: Fast-tracking health supplies to affected populations

November 2013

Reference : 

http://www.who.int/features/2013/philippines-health-supplies/en/index.html

The Philippine Government has set up a “one-stop shop” at Mactan International Airport in Cebu to ensure the rapid delivery of incoming aid. WHO’s role within the one-stop shop is to facilitate coordination with international organizations bringing relief supplies for health into the country.

Mactan International Airport in Cebu in the central Philippines is the biggest of five supply hubs for humanitarian aid coming into the country in response to Typhoon Haiyan, with relief supplies from 28 countries arriving every day.

To ensure rapid delivery of incoming aid, the Philippine Government has set up a “one-stop shop” at the airbase where all paperwork and procedures required to clear supplies happen in one location.

Coordination of relief supplies for health

WHO staff in discussions with Philippine Officials at Cebu airbase on the earliest plane leaving for Tacloban to deliver health supplies.

WHO/I. Hamam

The Government has allocated space for WHO within the one-stop shop to facilitate coordination with international organizations bringing relief supplies for health into the country. From there, WHO works with more than 20 organizations to coordinate supply tracking, clearances, loading and dispatching of medicines and medical equipment to typhoon-affected areas.

“After the typhoon, when there was a massive surge of humanitarian aid, many international organizations were unfamiliar with the procedures for bringing in relief supplies and getting them to affected areas. The Government recognized the added value of WHO’s role in coordinating with the range of organizations bringing in health supplies, and brought us into the one-stop shop from the very beginning,” says Rémy Prohom, WHO logistician at Mactan Airport.

Online supply tracking system

In an emergency of this scale, one of the biggest challenges has been keeping track of the massive amounts of supplies coming in, and identifying where they need to go. As aid continues to come in from donors and partners, WHO is establishing an online supply tracking system to track health items from the moment they are sent until they are distributed to the affected population.

“When we are get shipments cleared through customs and find the best ways to get them transported to affected areas, we know that we’re doing our part to help save peoples’ lives.”

Rémy Prohom, WHO logistician at Mactan Airport

Once supplies have been cleared through required procedures they are reloaded onto planes, boats and trucks headed for hard-hit areas like Tacloban, Roxas and Ormoc. This needs to be carefully coordinated as airbases in some affected areas are still functioning at low capacity due to power shortages and limited storage space.

More than 24 flights leave Mactan airbase every day carrying relief supplies to affected areas. “The support we have seen from the international community is overwhelming,” said Butch Guevera, senior spokesperson for the Philippine Air Force.

WHO humanitarian supply hubs

In addition to facilitating the transportation and delivery of arriving supplies, WHO has flown medicines and medical equipment into Cebu from its own humanitarian supply hubs in Accra, Ghana, Brindisi, Italy, and Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

“We have a storage warehouse at Cebu pier for WHO supplies such as medicines, emergency kits and tents. We dispatch these to WHO staff working on relief efforts in other parts of the country as and when they’re needed, and we also make them available to partners with staff on the ground,” says Rémy.

“Working with the Government, our role is to make sure that assistance can be delivered to people in need without delays or constraints. When we are get shipments cleared through customs and find the best ways to get them transported to affected areas, we know that we’re doing our part to help save peoples’ lives.”

Professor Nick Shaw awarded 2013 Bowl of Hygeia Award

Nov 20  2013

Reference:

http://www.psa.org.au/media-releases/professor-nick-shaw-awarded-2013-bowl-of-hygeia-award

Leading Queensland pharmacy figure Professor Nick Shaw has been awarded this year’s prestigious Bowl of Hygeia Award which recognises an exceptional individual service to the pharmacy profession.

The award was announced at the annual dinner of the Queensland Branch of the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia by Branch President Professor Lisa Nissen.

Professor Shaw was presented the award in recognition of his leadership in drawing the Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence (PACE) to successful completion, retaining its original concept of strong links to the profession, and utilising those links to achieve a contemporary curriculum and a connected, engaged student cohort.

Professor Nissen said Professor Shaw was recognised for his contribution to education leadership, his advocacy for the profession as Head of School at the University of Queensland, and also for his work as a member of a number of key professional committees.

“The Bowl of Hygeia Award is presented to a member of PSA who has demonstrated a consistently high standard of professional practice in support of the principles of pharmacy service to the community,” Professor Nissen said.
.
“Nick Shaw is known to most people in his many leadership roles as someone who goes about his work with commitment, dedication and grace; underneath which lies a strong and enduring passion for the profession.”

Professor Nissen said Professor Shaw had taken the PACE vision to reality as one of his first accomplishments on taking over as Head of School at UQ some 10 years ago.

“Nick coordinated the design of the research and teaching spaces, ensuring the relevant staff and key players were involved in the process to ensure that the outcomes were optimum for the School,” Professor Nissen said.

“Following on from this great work, Nick felt that the profession needed graduates that have a greater sense of belonging and connectedness to the profession.

“He believed that it was essential to establish an identity and feel part of our strong community and to entrench this early in the program he introduced a ’coating ceremony’ of which he invited PSA to become a partner.”

Professor Shaw has a very high representative profile outside of the School of Pharmacy and his roles include having been Chair of the Committee of Heads of Pharmacy Schools in Australia and NZ and also leading the group which in 2009 incorporated the Council of Pharmacy Schools, of which he is Chair. In addition he has held positions Australian Pharmacy Liaison Forum and Councillor of the Australian Pharmacy Council as well as being a member of its Accreditation Committee.

Professor Nissen said Professor Shaw had been genuinely surprised and touched at receiving the award.

“He paid homage to others before him, including Professor Sue Tett and key PSA people including Warren Blee, Peter Mayne and Jay Hooper as well as key people at the Pharmacy Guild including Kos Sclavos for helping to bring the initial PACE vision to reality for the profession in Queensland,” Professor Nissen said. “He is a most worthy, though humble, recipient.”

WHO issues new guidance for treating children with severe acute malnutrition

NOV , 27  2013

Reference: 

http://www.who.int/mediacentre/news/notes/2013/severe-acute-malnutrition-20131127/en/index.html

| GENEVA – WHO today released new treatment guidelines for the almost 20 million children under-five worldwide who have severe acute malnutrition.

Severe acute malnutrition is when children suffer severe wasting that may or may not be accompanied by swelling of the body from fluid retention. It occurs when infants and children do not have adequate energy, protein and micronutrients in their diet, combined with other health problems such as recurrent infections. It is diagnosed when the circumference of the upper arm is less than 115 mm or when the weight for height of a child is severely reduced.

Children with severe acute malnutrition are among the most vulnerable people in the world. They are very thin: most of their fat and muscle has been used by their bodies to stay alive.

Main recommendations

The updated WHO guidelines recommend that children with severe acute malnutrition who do not have health complications that require hospitalization, receive special, high-energy food and antibiotics to treat infection. This allows them to recover at home with their families. They also give guidance on how to treat them for HIV and, if necessary make recommendations on how to treat severely malnourished infants under six months.

“The guidelines are critical because many national health plans currently overlook children with severe acute malnutrition… If these children don’t get the right medical and nutritional care, very often they die,”

Dr Francesco Branca, Director, WHO Department of Nutrition for Health and Development

“The guidelines are critical because many national health plans currently overlook children with severe acute malnutrition. This can be fatal. If these children don’t get the right medical and nutritional care, very often they die,” says Dr Francesco Branca, Director of WHO’s Department of Nutrition for Health and Development.

New guidelines reflect new opportunities and technologies

The new guidelines supersede those issued by WHO in 1999 which recommended that all severely malnourished children be hospitalized, given fortified formula milk and appropriate treatment including antibiotics. The guidelines have been updated to reflect new opportunities and technologies that allow severely malnourished children who have an appetite and no evident medical complications to be effectively treated at home with specially-formulated foods that provide energy and nutrients and antibiotic medicines.

“It’s generally better for children and better for their families if they’re treated as outpatients,” says Dr Elizabeth Mason, Director of WHO’s Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health. “It can be easier for families who need to continue providing and caring for other children, and it allows vulnerable, malnourished children to stay home and avoid the risk of getting hospital infections.”

The proactive use of antibiotics is important because the immune system of a child who is severely malnourished can virtually shut down. This lack of immune response means both that the body cannot fight off infection and that tests may not detect infection, even when one is present. Evidence shows that giving a broad spectrum antibiotic such as amoxicillin enables the child’s body to fight off common infections like pneumonia and urinary tract infections which can be fatal to this group of children.

However, the new recommendation is specifically for children with severe acute malnutrition—not those who are simply undernourished. Widespread use of antibiotics among children who do not need them would increase the risk of infections becoming resistant to lifesaving antibiotics—a situation that would harm the health and survival of all children.

Severely malnourished children with HIV

Another new aspect of the guidelines relates to the treatment of severely malnourished children with HIV. The 1999 guidelines did not recommend HIV testing of children with severe acute malnutrition. At that time, there was poor availability and little experience of treating children with antiretroviral drugs. Circumstances today are very different. We now know that antiretrovirals significantly increase survival of children with HIV, and access to these drugs is improving. The new guidelines recommend that children with severe acute malnutrition in countries where HIV is common be routinely tested for the virus, and those who are positive should start on antiretroviral drugs as well as special foods and antibiotics to treat their severe malnutrition.

Infants under 6 months with severe acute malnutrition

The other group whose needs are addressed for the first time in these guidelines are infants under 6 months with severe acute malnutrition. WHO recommends that all babies under 6 months are exclusively breastfed for optimal nutrition and protection against infections. This is particularly important for babies who are severely malnourished. Health services should give special support to mothers of these infants to breastfeed as well as treating the child with antibiotics. If there is no realistic prospect of a severely malnourished baby being breastfed, the family may need breast milk from another woman, e.g. a family member, a neighbour, a wet nurse or a milk bank. If this is not possible, they will need infant formula and support to prepare and use it safely.


Queensland Graduate of the Year named

Nov , 20  2013

Reference : 

http://www.psa.org.au/media-releases/queensland-graduate-of-the-year-named

Scholastic achievement and a commitment to advancing the practice of pharmacy in Australia have combined to see Griffith University’s Rebecca Curran being named the Professor James Dare PSA Pharmacy Graduate of the Year for 2013.

The award honours Emeritus Professor James Dare who was a member of the Council of the PSA Qld Branch for many years and was awarded of a Fellowship of the Society as well as a Fellowship of the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia.

Presenting the awards, PSA Queensland Branch President Professor Lisa Nissen said Rebecca was an excellent pharmacy student who excelled in her studies, research and represented the university internationally.

“She is committed to advancing the pharmacy profession in Australia, and as the recipient of a Prime Ministers Australia Asia Postgraduate Award is currently completing her honours research at the National Heart Centre in Singapore,” Professor Nissen said.

“Upon completion of her internship she is committed to undertaking higher degree research. Rebecca has been a very involved and respected pharmacy student.

“She was outgoing and friendly and contributed greatly to her cohort. She was highly regarded by her peers and academics within the School of Pharmacy.”

In nominating Ms Curran, Griffith University said she was an honest, respectful and ethical young person who was committed to practising pharmacy with a high degree of professionalism.

“She is also enrolled into an honours degree and eager to complete her doctoral degree in pharmacy. Rebecca is keen to pursue a future career in hospital pharmacy and to advance the practice of pharmacy through research. Rebecca is an excellent student who has been a fantastic ambassador for our school and the pharmacy profession,” the nomination read.

Professor Nissen said Ms Curran stood out among an outstanding field of nominees made up of Rebecca, QUT’s Manisha Singh, JCU’s Karen Campbell and UQ’s Braedon Damon.

“These are outstanding young pharmacists who represent the very best of our profession as we move forward,” Professor Nissen said.

Ends

MEDIA CONTACT: Michelle Rosenthal 0414181641

PSA welcomes scrapping of cap on tax deductibility for education expenses

Nov 6 ,  2013

Reference : 

http://www.psa.org.au/media-releases/psa-welcomes-scrapping-of-cap-on-tax-deductibility-for-education-expenses

The announcement by the Treasurer, Joe Hockey, to scrap plans to introduce a $2000 cap on tax deductibility of education expenses has been welcomed by the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia.

The National President of PSA, Grant Kardachi, said the decision recognised the importance of continuing professional education and also the challenges that many people faced in meeting mandatory levels of annual continuing education.

“PSA fought hard to have this plan scrapped and our concerns, along with the concerns of other professional organisations, have been recognised and acted upon,” Mr Kardachi said.

“The Government must provide incentives and support for pharmacists and other professionals to undertake educational activities to further expand their knowledge and provide better healthcare for the public we serve, rather than impose barriers to further education.

“For the pharmacy profession, as with other professions in rural and remote settings, there are difficulties for pharmacists attending educational events.

“This would have severely disadvantaged pharmacists who are serving a critical health need in often difficult circumstances.

“For these pharmacists $2000 would not even pay for an airfare and accommodation to attend one professional education event in a major population centre, let alone pay for journal subscriptions and other education activities.

“Women would also have been particularly hard hit in the pharmacy profession as many work part time but still need to meet the annual mandatory continuing professional educational requirements to gain registration and to practise as pharmacists. About two thirds of the pharmacy workforce are women, often with young families and working part time.”

Mr Kardachi said the decision to scrap the plans was recognition that in effect it would have been an unfair tax on a captive group of professionals who must by law complete continuing education to maintain their professional registration.

PSA was a member of the Scrap the Cap Alliance, which had more than 60 member organisations covering more than 1.6 million professionals, including universities, pharmacists, nurses, engineers, accountants, lawyers, veterinarians, doctors, allied health professionals, and small business operators.

[Publication]: Forefront Volume 3 Number 41-46

Forefront

Forefront is a regular e-newsletter from the Pharmacy Guild of Australia.

Subscription is free and – while content is produced with Guild members in mind as the primary audience – open to anyone interested in news and current events relating to community pharmacy in Australia.

Just as community pharmacists are at the forefront of primary health care in the Australian community, Forefront aims to provide up-to-date, relevant and valuable content to subscribers.

Subscribers will receive regular (typically weekly) email summaries that link to more in-depth content on the Guild website. These summaries aim to provide a quick and convenient snapshot of news, which provides value to the reader even if they do not have time to view the expanded content.

Click here to subscribe and see below for links to recent editions.

Forefront issues

November

October 

Advice from the Heart Foundation on statins

Nov 01, 2013
Reference :

http://www.guild.org.au/news-page/2013/11/01/advice-from-the-heart-foundation-on-statins

The National Heart Foundation has issued the following media release in response to last night’s ABC Catalyst program in relation to heart medication and cholesterol:

Keep taking cholesterol medication

The National Heart Foundation of Australia is urging people not to change their medication or ignore their cholesterol levels following ABC media reports questioning the benefits of statins in the treatment of heart disease.

The call comes after the recent ABC Catalyst program questioned whether cholesterol is an important risk factor for heart disease and suggested the benefits of statins (cholesterol-lowering drugs) were overstated.

The Heart Foundation’s National CEO Dr Lyn Roberts said the program has caused confusion in the community and she was worried it may be putting lives at risk.

“We know patients are already contacting their GPs and health professionals anxious about their heart health on the basis of the program. The Heart Foundation and the wider medical community are concerned that people may have been misled and might stop taking their statins without consulting their doctor,” Dr Roberts said.

“The conclusions presented in the ABC Catalyst program are not supported by the Heart Foundation or the vast majority of the medical and scientific communities[i] across the country and internationally.

“High cholesterol remains a major risk factor for heart attack, stroke and peripheral vascular disease and having multiple risk factors places you at higher risk.

“We are shocked by the disregard of the evidence and we are considering our next course of action.”

The Heart Foundation’s Chief Medical Adviser Professor James Tatoulis said that after a heart attack, treatment with a statin is standard, evidence-based management.

“Cholesterol-lowering drugs, known as statins, are the most commonly prescribed drugs in Australia and are a very effective way of reducing the risk of having a heart attack, particularly for people who have heart disease,” Prof Tatoulis said.

“Some of the largest studies ever conducted in medicine have demonstrated that statins decrease further heart attacks and save lives.

“Cholesterol remains an important risk factor for heart disease, but it’s important to remember that it’s just one risk factor and all other risks need to be considered to work out a person’s overall risk of heart attack.

“The Heart Foundation recommends that cholesterol, along with other risk factors including blood pressure, BMI, family history, smoking and physical inactivity are all considered when determining someone’s risk and if they need drug treatment.

“For many, their medication is life-saving but medication is never a substitute for a healthy lifestyle – we encourage all Australians to be active for 30 minutes a day, to eat healthily, be smoke-free and to achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

“We want everyone to be aware of their risk factors and recommend everyone 45 and over (35 if you are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander person) to visit their GP annually for a heart health check to calculate their risk of having a heart attack and discuss how to manage their risks with their doctor.”

One in three Australians adults, or 5.6 million have high cholesterol – a risk factor for Australia’s number one killer of men and women. [ii]

Information from the Heart Foundation on how to lower your cholesterol is available at

http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/healthy-eating/fats/Pages/cholesterol.aspx or by calling our Health Information Service on 1300 36 27 87.

– ends –

Previous media release on Part 1 of the Catalyst “Heart of the Matter” report is available at: http://www.heartfoundation.org.au/news-media/Media-Releases-2013/Pages/cholesterol-important-risk-factor-heart-disease.aspx


[i] The World Health Organisation, American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology, British Heart Foundation, National Collaborating Centre for Primary Care and Royal College of General Practitioners, United Kingdom, European Society of Cardiology, New Zealand Heart Foundation

Pharmacy Guild welcomes scrapping of the cap

Nov 06, 2013
Reference :

http://www.guild.org.au/news-page/2013/11/06/pharmacy-guild-welcomes-scrapping-of-the-cap

The Pharmacy Guild of Australia has welcomed the decision of the Abbott Government to scrap the former Government’s proposed cap on tax deductions for work-related self-education expenses.

The proposed measure was bad public policy, and contrary to the interests of a skilled workforce with the most up-to-date professional knowledge to assist in the treatment of patients.

As a condition of ongoing registration to practice, pharmacists by law must undertake a mandatory amount of continuing professional development, with accredited pharmacists having additional requirements. It made no sense to cap the level of support for this mandatory self-education.

The Executive Director of the Guild, David Quilty, said: “This is a good decision by Treasurer Hockey.  By abolishing the proposal, the Abbott Government has removed a risk that the quality and safety of health delivery in Australia would be reduced.

“We were pleased to be able to work constructively with the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia – as well as many other professional organisations – to make the case against this counterproductive savings measure,” he said.