Good Pharmacy Practice-NEW Joint FIP-WHO GPP Joint Guidelines released at the FIP Congress in Hyderabad

Good Pharmacy Practice-NEW Joint FIP-WHO GPP Joint Guidelines released at the FIP Congress in Hyderabad

FIP Calls Attention To Medicines Shortages

During the  71st Congress in Hyderabad, India, the Council of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP), the largest gathering of all FIP’s 130 member organisations from around the world and representing more than three million pharmacists, met to discuss the emergent issue of medicines shortages.


The Council unanimously concluded that medicines are not simple items of commerce; they are an essential component of patient care. Many countries are experiencing shortages of critical prescription medicines. This has given rise to disruption of treatments in conditions including, but not limited to, epilepsy, diabetes, asthma, infectious diseases and cancer, resulting in patients receiving less effective care or sometimes none at all.

Causes of these shortages are wide and varied, such as manufacturing problems, shortages of raw materials, evolving regulatory practices, and changing market incentives.

The Council of the International Pharmaceutical Federation calls on all stakeholders, including governments, pharmaceutical manufacturers, pharmacy wholesalers, pharmaceutical purchasing agencies, medicine insurance plans, pharmaceutical regulators and the pharmacy profession to urgently evaluate these issues and work to ensure continuity of medication supply so that the appropriate treatment of patients can be initiated and maintained.

Important Press Release From FIP and WPPF-President John Ware


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Important Press Release From FIP and WPPF-President John Ware

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At the FIP Council meeting in Hyderabad, India, the representatives of the Canadian Pharmaceutical Association raised concerns regarding shortages of essential medicines in their country and the United States. 

Following discussion that there were shortages of many essential medicines occurring regularly on a global scale and produced the following explanatory press release. 

The meeting of the Council representing all FIP’s 130 member organisations from around the world and representing more than 3 million pharmacists discussed the issue of medicine shortages. 

WPPF President, John Ware, asks all member organisations and individuals that the following facts be brought to the attention of all stakeholders.  The press release is as follows –

The Council unanimously concluded that medicines are not simple items of commerce; they are an essential component of patient care. Many countries are experiencing shortages of critical prescription medicines. This has given rise to disruption of treatments in conditions including, but not limited to, epilepsy, diabetes, asthma, infectious diseases and cancer, resulting in patients receiving less effective care or sometimes none at all.

Causes of these shortages are wide and varied, such as manufacturing problems, shortages of raw materials, evolving regulatory practices, and changing market incentives.

The Council of the International Pharmaceutical Federation calls on all stakeholders, including governments, pharmaceutical manufacturers, pharmacy wholesalers, pharmaceutical purchasing agencies, medicine insurance plans, pharmaceutical regulators and the pharmacy profession to urgently evaluate these issues and work to ensure continuity of medication supply so that the appropriate treatment of patients can be initiated and maintained.

For further information on this and other issues brought to attention at the FIP Congress in Hyderabad please contact the Press office at press@fip.org.

Sec. Update!(2011 09/25 )

Topic:Updates! (25th Sep)

WPPF Website Updates at A Glance!

 

Hottest News

1.Important Press Release From WPPF-President  John Ware

2.2011 FIP WORLD CONGRESS-A Travel Grant Recipient Report Bryan

   Posadas, Philippines

 

New updates in “Country Activities”:

 

Australia

1.

A New Era of Home Medication Management

2.

PGA Newsletter Vol.1 No.18,14th September2011

3.

PGA Newsletter Vol.1 No.19,21st September2011

4.

eHealth Demonstration Welcome

5

Harm Minisation Under The Spotlight

6.

Is It Any Good & Does It Matter?

7.

High End Pharmacy Education In The High Country


8.

Pharmacsits In Health-Care – Opportunities To Diversity

9.

Australian Pharmacist September 2011 Vol 30 No 9

Taiwan

1.

Connect RFID and barcodes to improve the safety of Drug Delivery System


Renew The Application Format For Medical Payment? TPIP: Get More Discussion! 

 

New updates in “International”:

1.

Priority medicines for mothers and children 2011

2.

Access To Non Communible Diseases Medicines

New updates in “Publication”

1.

NCD Alliance Briefing Paper – Access to Essential Medicines and Technologies for NCDs. (The NCD Alliance – Putting Non-communicable Diseases on the Global Agenda)

 

For full content, please refer to each section. Thank you.

2011 FIP WORLD CONGRESS-A Travel Grant Recipient Report Bryan Posadas, Philippines

The 2011 World Congress of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP) is an experience each Pharmacist from developing country will dream of to attend the first time, and will be aimed for, every year thereafter.

The privilege I received as one of the recipients of the travel grant given by the FIP Foundation through the Western Pacific Pharmaceutical Forum lead by Pres. John Ware, is something that I will be forever indebted to. The opportunity given to me by the Foundation allowed me to see my profession as a Pharmacist in a different perspective. From the lessons learned in the sessions, to the learning experiences of other Pharmacists, up to establishing networks and meeting new friends from different countries.

During the Opening Ceremony, I was in awe seeing over 2,000 delegates representing 98 countries; in addition to my amazement is the presence of the President of India, Pratibha Devisingh Patil along with the Governor of the State of Andra Pradesh, E.S.L. Narasimhan, the Chief Minister of Andra Pradesh, N. Kiran Kumar Reddy and the Minister for Medical and Health Affairs of the Government of Andra Pradesh, Dr. D.L. Ravindra Reddy and Dr. Hiroki Nakatani, Assistant Director-General of WHO, Tuberculosis, Malaria and Neglected Tropical Diseases. Having these people in the ceremony made me realize, I am really in a very important congress and should be ready to bring home knowledge and wisdom which I can use to equip other Pharmacists in the Philippines and help improve the Pharmacy practice in my own country.

I attended the Forum for Innovators in Pharmacy Practice hosted by CPS. I was able to acquire additional knowledge in financial decisions to enable the setting of fees for services given by the Pharmacists, and on how Pharmaceutical services can be costed which includes income, expenditure and break even points. The lecture given by Mr. Dennis Helling, Executive Director Pharmacy Operations and Therapeutics of Kaiser Permanente Colorado, motivates me to innovate the Pharmacy Services in my company which is also of the same model of Health Care system. The insights given by Mr. Helling are very significant and relevant to the pharmacy practice in my country. The innovations they applied at Kaiser Permanente can definitely improve the pharmacy services in a developing country such as ours.

Other topics that got my interest are the presentation of the FIP Member Organizations presenting National Updates, FIP Symposium on Counterfeit Medicines, Mapping a new vision – Translating ideas into practice, Innovations to improve teaching and learning, and the Pharmacists and Mass Communication – A job the needs to be done continuously. The learning I acquired from this lectures can be used to fulfill my objectives in attending the World Congress. This can be incorporated to the lectures I am conducting for Pharmacists, Pharmacy Students and Pharmacy Assistants.

Aside from the sessions I attended to, it is also of importance to attend social events and business meetings. The social events allowed me to build networks in different countries. These activity resulted to the preliminary meeting of a regional Young Pharmacists Group (Asia – YPG) represented by five Asian Countries namely, Taiwan, Malaysia, South Korea, Japan and Philippines. Additional meetings are set as the new group of innovative Young Pharmacists will be conceived to work and boost the National YPGs of different Asian Countries and move as a critical force in improving the practice of Pharmacy in their respective countries. The group will embark on developing young pharmacists in their technical skills as well as Leadership, Integrity, Excellence and Communication skills. Projects to improve collaborative practice was initially discussed which includes Young Pharmacists Exchange Program, aimed to learn the best practices from other countries and apply it to their respective countries, and share inputs as well to improve practice in the host country. YPG Summit was also discussed.

The network established during the Congress also conceived a Joint Project from a group of Young Pharmacists from United Kingdom, Philippines and Malaysia. The project will be focusing on reaching out an underprivileged community in the Philippines through house building, Layman’s forum on rational use of medicines, Medical mission and Seminar for Young Pharmacists.

In summary, the objectives that were set in attending the World Congress of Pharmacists was accomplished and new projects are now conceptualized and awaiting realization all aimed to improve Pharmacy Practice in my country. The Congress experience boost my confidence that there is something we can do to make a change and improve our practice, this also helped me re-align my personal vision and mission as a Pharmacists to concur with the Vision and the Mission of our National Association (Philippine Pharmacists Association) and that of the International Pharmaceutical Federation (FIP).

If I were to be given an opportunity to attend the World Congress again through a travel grant, I will be very much honored for it. However, I will be giving this opportunity to other Young Pharmacists to experience what I have experienced. If I may say it, this is a once in a lifetime experience, that every Pharmacists must experience. This World Congress motivates me to do my best to attend the next World Congress in Amsterdam and be part of the Centennial Celebration of the FIP.

Australian Pharmacist September 2011 Vol 30 No 9

Change Paves The Way For The Future

When looking at changes in practice, we must take into account that there are two major elements of such changes:
the introduction of new services to ensure the viability of the profession, and how such services fit into existing business and professional models.

Those who were at PAC10 last year may have heard an excellent presentation by Bill Zellmer from the United States who pointed out that to meet the needs of the public and ensure our survival as a health profession, pharmacy practices must shift their primary mission from supplying medicines to helping people make the best use of medicines – that is, also provide professional services in addition to dispensing.

He emphasised that such an outcome requires a change in the pharmacist’s self-concept, which in turn entails the development of a ‘strong moral compass and a deep commitment to professionalism’.A very interesting observation to arise from the presentation was that many pharmacists lead ‘divided lives’ in that they know what they need to do to help patients make the best use of medicines but they often do not act on this knowledge, partly because they feel existing practices within their pharmacy hinder them in doing so or because they are content in carrying on the way they do business, because that is the way it
has always been done.

This results in either services not being offered or simply being added on to existing operations in the pharmacy without any real consideration being given to their most effective introduction or how their introduction will affect existing operations.

It is important, therefore, that pharmacies prepare and adapt for the introduction of new services. Clinical interventions and MedsChecks are cases in point where, to gain maximum benefit for the patient and the pharmacy practice, the model of business will need to change.


Interestingly, it appears from anecdotal evidence that most pharmacists recognise the need for change, but not how to implement it.

To successfully implement the changes required to transition pharmacy from a primarily dispensing role to one in which professional services are an increasing focus requires the full involvement of pharmacists and their staff, policy makers, educators and other health stakeholders.

Policy makers in Australia have already signalled their acceptance of the need for change by including additional professional services into the Fifth Community Pharmacy Agreement.

For Full Content,please refer to :Australian Pharmacist September 2011 Vol 30 No 9

Pharmacsits In Health-Care – Opportunities To Diversity

The role of pharmacists in health care is facing increasing scrutiny as part of large-scale reforms currently occurring across the Australian health system. However, with these reforms come great opportunities to diversify, but we need to know how to make the most of them.

To give pharmacists an insight into the various reforms and the opportunities they present for pharmacy to assert its role in many aspects of health service delivery, PAC11 will present a special session on Pharmacists in health care – opportunities to diversify which will details opportunities in areas such as preventive health, primary health care and throughout the hospital sector.

Presented by Alison Roberts, the session will include examples of changes that have occurred in other countries around the world,
“Many of these changes have included an increasing involvement of pharmacy in aspects of health care that have largely been in the domains of other health professions,” Dr Roberts said.

“If pharmacy in Australia is to be successful in exploiting the opportunities on offer, the profession needs to adapt to and accept change, refine existing roles, and diversify, by taking on new roles.”

For Full Content,please refer to:Pharmacsits In Health-Care – Opportunities To Diversity

High End Pharmacy Education In The High Country

The rapidly changing health environment presents many challenges for pharmacists who need constantly to increase their knowledge in the area of medication management.

Now ACT and regional pharmacists have the opportunity to achieve this education goal while enjoying some of the most idyllic scenery the region has to offer.

The ACT Branch of the Pharmaceutical Society of Australia is presenting its inaugural “Summer in the Snowys” at Lake Crackenback Resort in the Snowy Mountains on 26 and 27 November.

The weekend will feature leading pharmacy speakers Debbie Rigby and Geraldine Moses, and will help attendees gain a professional edge during a time when the profession is undergoing significant change and innovation.

For Full Content,please refer to:

High End Pharmacy Education In The High Country

Is It Any Good & Does It Matter?

Is It Any Good & Does It Matter?

The Critical Appraisal Workshop, or Is it any good & does it matter? will be held on Sunday 9 October and explore the key elements of a structured critical appraisal process. It will also help provide the skills for pharmacists to apply a structured critical appraisal approach to a research paper, which can sometimes seem like a daunting process.
The workshop will also help pharmacists to identify resources they can use to support this process.
By the end of this session participants will

 1.Be information ‘wise’
 2.Understand what it really means by ‘evidence based’ practice
 3.Gain insight into biases and inappropriate claims of treatment efficacy
 4.Have the confidence to advise staff and consumers on latest claims and reports on

       medicinesand treatments

For Full Content,please refer to: Is It Any Good & Does It Matter?

Harm Minisation Under The Spotlight

Harm minimisation is a growing area of pharmacy practice and its importance will continue to gain prominence with the evolution to a more collaborative health-care model. To help pharmacists take advantage of the opportunities presented by the provision of harm minimisation services, a pre Congress session is being held on Thursday, 6 October 2011, at PAC11.

The session will examine a range of relevant topics including issues where speakers will delve into the current state of the nation, national legislative and procedural state variations and interstate transfer procedures.

In addition, presentations covering state and national statistics and the international and Australian situations in drug misuse/overuse will help delegates keep abreast of current developments.
Looking to the future, the session will cover new treatments on the horizon while also looking at the important topic of client-pharmacy dispute and issue resolution mechanisms. This session will also provide an allocated forum for pharmacists to ask questions, clarify issues, and identify concerns and themes.

For Full Content,please refer to: Harm Minisation Under The Spotlight